What we do

SLDP is a legal NGO and is constantly addressing challenges and needs where its skill set is necessary to navigate the Syrian context and the related legal challenges.

To that end, we have established two units:

The International Law Support Unit, ILSU:

With a mandate of equipping Syrian NGOs, including victims’ and women-led organizations, with self-sufficient capacity in international law to conduct their efforts and accomplish their mission in fighting impunity creatively. This Unit has four current key priorities:

Proactive and Reactive International Law Support:

ILSU assists SNGOs in understanding and utilizing international law as it arises in their work and as it relates to conflict and post/frozen-conflict transitions. SLDP’s active legal support is reactive to SNGOs requests and proactive with regards to premeditated needs addressed before they arise in fore.

Engaging with New International Actors Relevant to Syria and Human Rights:

SLDP facilitates the SNGOs’ expansion of advocacy and engagement with new states on the international landscape to empower them to effectively address the human rights crisis and shape international policy through a genuine coordinated effort.

Building Sustainable Human Rights Strategies:

SLDP seeks to revitalize Syrian human rights organizations and help set the stage for the next turn of SNGOs activity in a post/frozen-conflict Syria through facilitating the elaboration of a clear vision, understanding of priorities, and critically assessed strategy under implementation for future human rights programming.

Engaging with UN Human Rights Mechanisms and Special Procedures:

SLDP works on increasing SNGO’s meaningful long-term engagement with the UN Human Rights Mechanisms to assist them with their mandates to document crimes committed throughout Syria and their perpetrators, ultimately contributing towards the process of transitional justice and setting of human rights priorities.

The Human Rights and Business Unit, HRBU:

With a mandate to create initiatives and increase the ability of stakeholders, including SNGOs, state actors and INGOs, to influence and use alternative forms of accountability against perpetrators of corporate-related human rights abuses in the Syrian conflict.

Improving Human Rights Due Diligence of Humanitarian Actors Operating in Syria:

SLDP engages with humanitarian actors, including INGOs and UN agencies regarding their role in contributing to business-related human rights violations in Syria and financing suspected war criminals. Through SLDP’s combined knowledge of the conflict and economic situation in Syria and international business and human rights norms, SLDP provides humanitarian INGOs and UN agencies with support on developing Syrian context-specific human rights due diligence for procurement activities in Syria.

Seeking Accountability Through Sanctions Regimes:

As judicial accountability and transitional justice mechanisms are long term activities not yet being implemented, SLDP is seeking to find financial related mechanisms of accountability for perpetrators of business-related human rights violations in Syria. SLDP is particularly interested in sanctions regimes as an interim measure of accountability.

Engaging Stakeholders in Syria’s Reconstruction:

SLDP engages with stakeholders in Syria’s reconstruction, including states, international NGOs, UN agencies, and businesses to increase their awareness on the potential human rights impacts of participation in reconstruction in Syria under the current reconstruction framework.

Increasing Syrian NGOs Capacity on Business and Human Rights Law:

SLDP works to provide support to Syrian NGOs on business and human rights as well as the business-related human rights impacts of Syrian reconstruction legislation to help Syrian NGOs to be prepared to respond to the human rights impacts of reconstruction. Moreover, SLDP works with Syrian NGOs to ensure they are aware of the business and financial related accountability mechanisms to hold perpetrators of business-related human rights violations, including those involved in reconstruction, accountable.

What we do

What we do

SLDP is a legal NGO and is constantly addressing challenges and needs where its skill set is necessary to navigate the Syrian context and the related legal challenges.

To that end, we have established two units:

The International Law Support Unit, ILSU:

With a mandate of equipping Syrian NGOs, including victims’ and women-led organizations, with self-sufficient capacity in international law to conduct their efforts and accomplish their mission in fighting impunity creatively. This Unit has four current key priorities:

Proactive and Reactive International Law Support:

ILSU assists SNGOs in understanding and utilizing international law as it arises in their work and as it relates to conflict and post/frozen-conflict transitions. SLDP’s active legal support is reactive to SNGOs requests and proactive with regards to premeditated needs addressed before they arise in fore.

Engaging with New International Actors Relevant to Syria and Human Rights:

SLDP facilitates the SNGOs’ expansion of advocacy and engagement with new states on the international landscape to empower them to effectively address the human rights crisis and shape international policy through a genuine coordinated effort.

Building Sustainable Human Rights Strategies:

SLDP seeks to revitalize Syrian human rights organizations and help set the stage for the next turn of SNGOs activity in a post/frozen-conflict Syria through facilitating the elaboration of a clear vision, understanding of priorities, and critically assessed strategy under implementation for future human rights programming.

Engaging with UN Human Rights Mechanisms and Special Procedures:

SLDP works on increasing SNGO’s meaningful long-term engagement with the UN Human Rights Mechanisms to assist them with their mandates to document crimes committed throughout Syria and their perpetrators, ultimately contributing towards the process of transitional justice and setting of human rights priorities.

The Human Rights and Business Unit, HRBU:

With a mandate to create initiatives and increase the ability of stakeholders, including SNGOs, state actors and INGOs, to influence and use alternative forms of accountability against perpetrators of corporate-related human rights abuses in the Syrian conflict.

Improving Human Rights Due Diligence of Humanitarian Actors Operating in Syria:

SLDP engages with humanitarian actors, including INGOs and UN agencies regarding their role in contributing to business-related human rights violations in Syria and financing suspected war criminals. Through SLDP’s combined knowledge of the conflict and economic situation in Syria and international business and human rights norms, SLDP provides humanitarian INGOs and UN agencies with support on developing Syrian context-specific human rights due diligence for procurement activities in Syria.

Seeking Accountability Through Sanctions Regimes:

As judicial accountability and transitional justice mechanisms are long term activities not yet being implemented, SLDP is seeking to find financial related mechanisms of accountability for perpetrators of business-related human rights violations in Syria. SLDP is particularly interested in sanctions regimes as an interim measure of accountability.

Engaging Stakeholders in Syria’s Reconstruction:

SLDP engages with stakeholders in Syria’s reconstruction, including states, international NGOs, UN agencies, and businesses to increase their awareness on the potential human rights impacts of participation in reconstruction in Syria under the current reconstruction framework.

Increasing Syrian NGOs Capacity on Business and Human Rights Law:

SLDP works to provide support to Syrian NGOs on business and human rights as well as the business-related human rights impacts of Syrian reconstruction legislation to help Syrian NGOs to be prepared to respond to the human rights impacts of reconstruction. Moreover, SLDP works with Syrian NGOs to ensure they are aware of the business and financial related accountability mechanisms to hold perpetrators of business-related human rights violations, including those involved in reconstruction, accountable.